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Optimisation of Olea Europaea Stone – Activated Carbon Preparation Using Response Surface Methodology for Thiamphenicol Removal in Fixed Bed Column
 
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LS3MN2E-CERNE2D, Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Av IbnBattouta, B.P. 1014, Rabat 10000, Morocco
 
2
LS3MN2E-CERNE2D, ENSAM, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Av Ibn Battouta, B.P. 1014, Rabat 10000, Morocco
 
 
Corresponding author
Souad El Hajjaji   

LS3MN2E-CERNE2D, Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Av IbnBattouta, B.P. 1014, Rabat 10000, Morocco
 
 
Ecol. Eng. Environ. Technol. 2024; 9
 
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ABSTRACT
Olive stones waste is a widely available agricultural waste. That can be used as an alternative feedstock for activated carbon production applied for wastewater treatment. In this study, activated carbon preparation was optimised using a fractional The long-term accumulation and residue of the micropollutant thiamphenicol in aquatic environments have significantly harmed biological systems. Therefore, removing organic micropollutants using activated carbon is a frequent and essential procedure in advanced wastewater treatment. Olive stones can be used as an alternative feedstock for producing activated carbon for wastewater treatment. In this study, the preparation of activated carbon was optimized using a fractional factorial design experiment with five factors: concentration, heating rate, activation temperature, activation time, and impregnation ratio. The specific surface area (SSA) was calculated using the methylene blue method and was considered the response parameter of the synthesis. Thiamphenicol (THI) adsorption tests were conducted in a fixed-bed column after characterizing the optimal activated carbon prepared with phosphoric acid (OACPA). The results showed that the optimal conditions for activated carbon preparation were a solid-liquid ratio of 1:2 for phosphoric acid (74.52%), a temperature of 550°C with a heating rate of 10°C/min, and an activation time of 120 minutes, yielding an activated carbon with an SSA of 53.07 m²/g. The THI removal tests indicated that the flow rate and initial THI concentration were inversely proportional to the THI removal efficiency, whereas the bed height positively affected the removal percentage.
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