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Mapping Groundwater Potential Zones with GIS-RS-AHP Under Climate Change: Case of Mostaganem Plateau, Northwest Algeria
 
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1
Civil and Environmental Engineering Laboratory (LGCE), Faculty of Technology, University of Djillali Liabes, 22000 Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria
 
2
CEDETE Laboratory EA 1210, University of Orleans, 10 Rue de Tours, 45069 Orléans, France
 
3
Laboratory of Management and Water treatment (LGTE), Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Science and Technology of Oran-Mohamed Boudiaf, BP 1505, El M’Naouer, Oran 31000, Algeria
 
 
Corresponding author
Cherifa Hanene Kamelia Chemirik   

Civil and Environmental Engineering Laboratory (LGCE), Faculty of Technology, University of Djillali Liabes, 22000 Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria
 
 
Ecol. Eng. Environ. Technol. 2024; 6
 
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ABSTRACT
In arid regions with growing water needs due to growing populations and agriculture, heightened by climate change, groundwater arises as a crucial asset. This research evaluates climate change influence on groundwater potential zones (GPZs) during 2000 and 2014, within the Mostaganem plateau's alluvial aquifer in Algeria, using a methodology that integrates analytical hierarchy process (AHP), remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS). Forecasts for 2030 and 2050 were conducted using the QGIS MOLUSCE plugin. Findings reveal a (30.29%) decrease in zones of moderate potential, the vanishing of high potential sectors, alongside a (7.53%) and a (22.1%) rise in fair potential and low potential, respectively, from 2000 to 2014. Between 2014 and 2030, fair and moderate potential decrease by 6.62% and 0.48%, while low potential zones see a 7.47% increase. These shifts are linked to changes in rainfall, distribution, and land use land cover (LULC), notably intensive agriculture of herbaceous crops. Slight changes are anticipated between 2030 and 2050, possibly due to the onset of a resilience equilibrium from 2030 onwards. These findings are crucial as a preliminary investigation, highlighting the necessity of optimal groundwater management.
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